After the release of the Ontario early psychosis intervention (EPI) Program standards

Research Report Round-up: Results of survey of current practice

In brief

The Standards Implementation Steering Committee (SISC) supports Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI) programs in implementing the Ontario Early Psychosis Intervention Program Standards, released by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) in 2011.

The SISC conducted two surveys to learn about current program practices and needs in relation to the standards. In this Research Report Round-up. we provide the highlights from a report released by the SISC, which focuses on the results from survey 2, conducted in 2014 to obtain feedback on Standards 7-13.

Title and link to report: After the Release of the Ontario Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI) Program Standards: Results of the 2014 EPI program survey of current practices in relation to the Standards

Authors: Standards Implementation Steering Committee (SISC)

Year: 2015

Location: Toronto, Ontario

Type of study: Survey; all 56 full-service Ontario EPI programs were invited to complete the survey and all responded

Keywords: Early psychosis intervention; Ontario; program standards

Contact person/source: Avra Selick at Avra [dot] Selick [at] camh [dot] ca or Janet Durbin at Janet [dot] Durbin [at] camh [dot] ca; for more information, visit the EPION website

Language: English; separate documents are also available for the executive report and main messages

What this report is about

The Standards Implementation Steering Committee (SISC) supports Early Psychosis Intervention (EPI) programs in implementing the Ontario Early Psychosis Intervention Program Standards, released by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) in 2011. The SISC conducted two surveys to learn about current program practices and needs in relation to the standards.

This report focuses on the results from survey 2, conducted in 2014 to obtain feedback on Standards 7-13. Key findings highlight:

  • Capacity;
  • Training;
  • Monitoring and evaluation;
  • Barrier-free service and health equity;
  • Networks;
  • Accountability.

Some of the feedback questions posed to EPI programs include:

  • Extent to which implementation of the standard was supporting high quality care;
  • Strategies to implement the standard;
  • Availability of administrative supports to implement the standard;
  • Good practice examples; and
  • Challenge examples.

Key findings include:

  • 220 clinical staff members provide EPI services to almost 4000 clients across the province 
  • Programs are using a variety of training and education activities to prepare their staff to deliver EPI. Still, more training time and resources are desired, given the complexity (e.g., multiple components) of the model, the continually expanding evidence base, and the challenges of staff turnover and multiple program sites.
  • Programs regularly collect client data but need more time and expertise to use the data for monitoring and to improve service delivery 
  • The majority of EPI programs have formed networks where they share and support each other to deliver the full model. Networks are particularly important for small programs.

SISC is actively working to build the relationship between the EPI Ontario Network (EPION) and partners at the MOHLTC and Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) to follow-up on survey findings and continue work to improve access and quality of EPI care.

Read the findings from the first survey.

How can this report be used

The assessed standards in this report are intended to help EPI programs:

  • deliver consistent, high-quality care;
  • meet the Ontario vision of accessible care;
  • work with other EPI service providers to deliver the full EPI model; and
  • comply with government accountability expectations.

EPI programs, LHINs, and academic audiences can use this report to better understand EPI services in Ontario and areas where programs require further support.

 

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