Open hearts, open minds: Services that are inclusive of First Nations, Métis and Inuit families

In brief

The importance of inclusion in services for families has gained increasing attention over the past 40 years. This report tries to answer the questions: What does “inclusion” mean and how can those who work with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit families apply it to their daily work? How can practices, programs, and policies be more inclusive of all people being served?

The goal of the report is to provide information to support the development of inclusive services for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit families. It offers key concepts and approaches for being inclusive as well as an overview of Canada’s history, which helps to explain why Aboriginal peoples have been excluded and marginalized from services.

The report also includes inclusive strategies, policies, hiring practices, attitudes, spaces and relationships. It looks at the importance of cultural context and cultural safety, how to determine needs, and on how to engage and retain Aboriginal families in services.

EENet has developed a Research Report Round-up of the report, “Open hearts, open minds: Services that are inclusive of First Nations, Métis and Inuit families.”

Research Report Round-ups are brief summaries of research reports, presented in a user-friendly format.

Read it below or download the PDF.

Title and link to report: Open hearts, open minds: Services that are inclusive of First Nations, Métis and Inuit families

Author: Best Start Resource Centre

Year of report: 2013

Location: Toronto

Language of report: English

What this report is about

The importance of inclusion in services for families has gained increasing attention over the past 40 years. This report tries to answer the questions: What does "inclusion" mean and how can those who work with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit families apply it to their daily work?  How can practices, programs, and policies be more inclusive of all people being served?

The goal of this report is to provide information to support the development of inclusive services for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit families. It offers key concepts and approaches for being inclusive. In an overview of Canada's history, the authors give a brief background as to why Aboriginal peoples have been excluded and marginalized from services.

The report also includes inclusive strategies, policies, hiring practices, attitudes, spaces and relationships. It looks at the importance of cultural context and cultural safety, how to determine needs, and on how to engage and retain Aboriginal families in services.

The approaches suggested in this report are drawn from different disciplines, the experiences of key informants, and the wisdom and experience of practitioners.

How can this report be used

The strategies and approaches suggested in this report can be of use to those who serve First Nations, Métis, and Inuit families, to ensure that the services they provide are inclusive and culturally sensitive.

Key words: Aboriginal, First Nations, Metis, Inuit, families, services

Contact person/source:

Best Start Resource Centre

Health Nexus

180 Dundas Street West, Suite 301

Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1Z8

beststart [at] healthnexus [dot] ca

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